The Invictus Games are Coming!

By Tiffany Miller, 
DoD News, Defense Media Activity 

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Michael Kacer, left, prepares for the 50-meter backstroke race during the swimming portion of the 2014 Invictus Games, the United Kingdom's version of the Warrior Games. DoD photo by Air Force Senior Airman Justyn M. Freeman

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Michael Kacer, left, prepares for the 50-meter backstroke race during the swimming portion of the 2014 Invictus Games, the United Kingdom’s version of the Warrior Games. DoD photo by Air Force Senior Airman Justyn M. Freeman

The United States has accepted the challenge and will host this year’s Invictus Games!  What are the Invictus Games, you ask? Here’s a hint: they are royal in nature, began in 2014 and involve injured service members from around the globe.

Back in 2013, England’s Prince Harry came to the U.S. to for the Warrior Games and decided that there must be an international sporting event of the same kind for wounded or sick service members. The prince worked fast, and the inaugural Invictus Games were born in London in 2014.

Competitors leave the starting blocks during a 100-meter sprint at the Invictus Games 2014 in London Sept. 11, 2014. The Invictus Games are the United Kingdom's version of the Warrior Games. DoD photo by Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua D. Sheppard

Competitors leave the starting blocks during a 100-meter sprint at the Invictus Games 2014 in London Sept. 11, 2014. The Invictus Games are the United Kingdom’s version of the Warrior Games. DoD photo by Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua D. Sheppard

Ultimately the word Invictus, which means unconquered, was chosen for the event because it embodies the fighting spirit of the service members participating in the games. The goal of these games and of the Invictus Foundation is to generate wider support, understanding and respect for these service members that have given so much for their countries.

The 2016 Invictus games will take place May 8-12 at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, Florida. Keep current with Invictus Games coverage by visiting defense.gov or follow us on Twitter: @DeptofDefense and @DoDNews.

To learn more about the Invictus story visit: https://invictusgamesfoundation.org/

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Lakin Booker, right, the gold medalist in the women's lightweight powerlifting event, and British Royal Navy weapons engineer Mickaela Richards, the silver medalist, pose for a photo during the 2014 Invictus Games. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justyn Freeman

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Lakin Booker, right, the gold medalist in the women’s lightweight powerlifting event, and British Royal Navy weapons engineer Mickaela Richards, the silver medalist, pose for a photo during the 2014 Invictus Games. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justyn Freeman

Related Stories: Wounded Warriors, Prince Harry Inspire Each Other

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