Hats Point to Diversity, Size of Coalition in Afghanistan

U.S., Australian, European and Afghan coalition members make up the color guard at the Army change of command ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2, 2016. Photo by D. Myles Cullen

U.S., Australian, European and Afghan coalition members make up the color guard at the Army change of command ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2, 2016. Photo by D. Myles Cullen

By Jim Garamone
DoD News, Defense Media Activity

There are 47 nations involved in the Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan. Nothing really illustrates the magnitude of the coalition effort so much as the different styles of hats on display.

The change of command between Army Gen. John F. Campbell and Army Gen. John W. Nicholson Jr. on March 2 in Kabul provided a showcase for just how many different nations are involved in the effort.

American forces wear the typical patrol caps. Of course, even those are a bit different, with all four services represented in the U.S. effort.

A slew of different hats can be seen from various coalition members at the Army change of command ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2, 2016. DoD photo by D. Myles Cullen

A slew of different hats can be seen from various coalition members at the Army change of command ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2, 2016. DoD photo by D. Myles Cullen

Australian forces wear the distinctive slouch hats with the rising sun insignia on them. These are sometimes called digger hats or bush hats, and the Aussies and their New Zealand compatriots have been wearing them since World War I, said an Australian officer.

You want berets? There were a passel of them at the ceremony. Blue berets, black berets, dark green ones. Brown berets, red berets, wide berets and small ones. Berets with feather sprouting out of them. Berets with national symbols. Each beret representing a different country, service or specialty.

There were even what Americans would call baseball caps. Police wore most of them, but the military from some contributing nations wore them, too.

The point in all this is the diversity of hats indicates a diversity of people, cultures and experiences somehow all working together toward a common goal and purpose.

The hats may be different, but the people who wear them are all on the same team.

Follow Jim Garamone on Twitter at @garamoneDoDNews, and follow the Department of Defense on Facebook and Twitter!

———-

Disclaimer: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of this website or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DOD website.

Check out these other posts:

This entry was posted in Defense Discussions, DoD News, Inside the DoD, Rotator and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>