Marines Hop Back in the Saddle

Photo Pfc. Folson Fairley-Baker uses a virtual driving simulator offered at Headquarters Battalion's 'back in the saddle training' held January 7 at the Maj. General James L. Day Conference Center. During the class, volunteers were given the chance to drive using the program to simulate the effects of driving under the influence or while being distracted. U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. T. Allen Bricker

Pfc. Folson Fairley-Baker uses a virtual driving simulator offered at Headquarters Battalion’s ‘back in the saddle training’ held January 7 at the Maj. General James L. Day Conference Center. During the class, volunteers were given the chance to drive using the program to simulate the effects of driving under the influence or while being distracted. U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. T. Allen Bricker

Story By Cpl. T. Allen Bricker | Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow

New Years has become synonymous with terms like ‘fresh start’ or ‘clean slate.’ This holds true for people across the world, including those in the armed forces.

The United States Marine Corps is always looking to improve in areas it both excels and lacks in. This includes unit’s safety, health and well-being. Along with their resolutions for the new year, Marines also receive training to get back in the swing of things after an extended holiday period.

To ensure the year started on the right foot, Headquarters Battalion (HqBn) aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow held a day of training Jan. 7, for its Marines to help make the transition back to work as seamless as possible.

The ‘back in the saddle’ training held was a series of classes throughout a day to educate Marines on important issues in the Marine Corps.

“It’s good to use this opportunity to welcome back the Marines from the holidays with something constructive,” said Sgt. Jacey Marks, assistant S-3 chief with HqBn. on base.

Several topics such as safe driving, suicide awareness and prevention, and hearing conservation are topics covered during the training. The day of training assessed key points the Marine Corps should stress importance on.

“The classes we gave at the BITS [back in the saddle] training are all things the Marine Corps feels is important to be aware of,” said Marks.

During each of the classes taught, Marines were asked to read portions of the presentation and were involved in discussions with the class. The goal was to get Marines critically thinking and take the discussions to heart, Marks explained.

Along with trying to better the Marine Corps as a whole, individual members of the organization are seeking self improvement as well. Cpl. Jonathon Norita, a supply clerk with

HqBn. intends to use the new year as a kick start to move his career in the right direction.

“I made a New Year’s resolution to make better decisions this year. I want to be able to lead Marines well, take them on runs, and give them advice,” explained Norita. “So, if I’m in good shape and make good choices, I could be that [noncommissioned officer] younger Marines want to look up to. That’s what I intend to do,” he added.

Even though the new year has begun and the Marine Corps and Marines individually have already started with their resolutions, it’s never too late to figure out who you are and seek self improvement.

 

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